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“We Must Reduce World’s Population” – Ex-chairman Hillary Clinton Campaign, John Podesta

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John Podesta

Former Clinton campaign chair John Podesta has outlined plans to implement a controversial eugenics program in order to depopulate the planet.

Writing for the Washington Post, Podesta claims that reducing the world’s population is not only desirable, but absolutely necessary in order to “reduce carbon emissions by 2050.”

Writing for WashingtonPost, Podesta writes:

When we talk about stepping up to address climate change across the world, we rarely think of it in terms of women’s rights. But if environmental activists really want to reduce emissions, raise living standards and build a more sustainable future, they cannot overlook the importance of reproductive rights and health.

Forging a coalition between the environmental movement and the women’s rights movement will not only fundamentally advance women’s rights but also do a world of good for the planet, which is bearing an environmental burden because of population growth.

It took 200,000 years for the human population to reach 2 billion in 1940 but only 75 years afterward for it to nearly triple to 7.6 billion people. The world gains 83 million inhabitants annually. That’s roughly the equivalent of another Chicago every two weeks, another Germany every year and another China every 16 years.

Population projection experts estimate a worst-case scenario in which we grow by 70 percent and reach a population of 13 billion people by the end of the century. But if we continue to invest in sensible international family-planning programs and accept the challenge of meeting the needs of women and families, we could potentially stabilize the population at below 10 billion.

Giving women across the globe access to reproductive rights and health is a moral imperative. Too many women in too many places, including the United States, still have unmet demands for access to family-planning resources. Estimates indicate that more than 200 million women want to prevent or delay pregnancy but aren’t using effective contraception. Access to reproductive health services can ensure women have more autonomy over their lives and bodies and ultimately help move the world toward greater gender parity.

Recent research has reinforced the understanding of the benefits of helping families plan the timing, spacing and number of their children. Brown University researchers showed that slowing population growth can enhance economic outcomes and reduce emissions simultaneously. In Nigeria, researchers found that achieving low fertility by 2050 could increase per capita income by 10 percent. Other studies have estimated that meeting the demand for family planning worldwide could potentially reduce carbon emissions in 2050 by 16 to 29 percent — the equivalent of ending worldwide deforestation today.

In fact, family planning ranks as one of the 10 most substantive solutions to climate change, according to a recent analysis of peer-reviewed research. In addition to being cost-effective from an emissions reduction perspective, the co-benefits to women and families across the globe are enormous.

That’s why 193 countries at the United Nations committed to universal access to sexual and reproductive health care as part of the 2015 Sustainable Development Goals.

Indeed, family planning, gender equality and maternal health targets in the SDGs reflect American leadership and values, which helped forge a global consensus over many years of development cooperation.

And yet, one of President Trump’s first acts in office was to widely expand the “global gag rule,” which blocks federal funding to any global health organization that provides, counsels on or advocates legal abortion services, including those providing family-planning services, HIV treatment and vaccinations.

These actions risk sacrificing American leadership and demand cooperation among other American actors and the rest of the world. This is where women’s rights activists and environmental activists have a powerful opportunity to push back and align their resources.

In addition to making family planning and reproductive health services universally available, we need to ensure that every child receives primary and secondary education and that we end the scourge of child marriage. New data from the United Nations found that if girls in the developing world all received secondary education, we would see a 42 percent decline in the fertility rate.

All of this is possible with broad public- and private-sector cooperation if foundations, governments, nongovernmental organizations and countless communities can forge a partnership to advance these goals and deliver the services needed to realize them.

American environmentalists and women’s rights advocates have every reason to feel under siege by the Trump administration. But this is all the more reason to find common cause in fighting for healthy women and a healthy planet.

Progress is made possible when groups that have long focused on single issues join forces to build fairer, more sustainable economies and societies.

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Business

Shoprite To Leave Nigeria After 15 Years

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South Africa’s grocery retailer Shoprite is leaving Africa’s biggest market, Nigeria, 15 years after it opened shop in the West African country.

The announcement by Shoprite came months after another South African brand, Mr Price, exited the market.

International supermarkets (excluding Nigeria) contributed 11.6% to group sales and reported 1.4% decline in sales from 2018. South African operations contributed 78% of overall sales and saw 8.7% rise for the year.

The company said it has been approached by potential investors willing to take over its Nigerian operations. It said it considering an outright sale of its operation or selling a majority stake in its Nigerian subsidiary.

“As such, Retail Supermarkets Nigeria Limited may be classified as a discontinued operation,” Shoprite said in a statement on Monday.

In April the supermarket announced it lost 8.1% of its sales in constant currency terms at the end of the second half (H2) of 2019 due to the September xenophobic attacks.

In September, Shoprite stores in Nigeria were vandalised and looted following an alleged xenophobic attack in South Africa, targeting Nigerians.

Owing to fears of further attacks several Shoprite stores across Lagos were sealed and guarded by police.

In the report released in April, the parent company stated that the impact of the store closures and drop in customer count resulted in a difficult half for the company.

Shoprite said the subsequent reduction in customer count during and after the crisis implies that some customers of the supermarkets in Nigeria boycotted the brand.

The difficult half development is not limited to Nigeria alone, as activities in some African nations also created holes in the revenue of Shoprite Holdings, especially the supermarkets out of the shores of South Africa (Non-RSA).

Also, the challenging trading conditions, store closures, load shedding, and currency devaluations in these counties resulted in the company’s furniture division, which includes its Non-RSA business. Due to this, Shoprite’s sale of merchandise dropped by 2.7%, while credit participation increased to 13.7% (2018: 12.5%) of the business’ R3.3 billion sales for the interim period.

However, ShopRite is not the only South African country leaving Nigeria. In June, Mr. Price Group also stated plans to close its Nigerian business to focus on its home market business in South Africa.

The popular affordable clothing, sport, and home wear brand has closed four out of its five Nigerian stores and expects to close the last one in the coming months.

Nigeria is the third country where the company has exited, as it had left Australia and Poland in 2019.

The Durban-based company cited challenges like supply-chain disruptions and challenges in getting funds out of the country as reasons it has struggled to operate in Nigeria.

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Entertainment

BBNaija 2020: Lilo Evicted From Show

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On Sunday, August 2 2020, Ebuka Obi-Uchendu announced Lilo as the second housemate to exit the Big Brother Naija house, this was shortly after Ka3na was evicted.

Their exit comes after spending a total of fourteen days in the house.

The 4 housemates who had the least votes are Lilo, Eric, Praise and Ka3na. The housemates were granted the opportunity to choose who would be sent home today.

The HoH had veto power if there was a tie.

All housemates were initially up for eviction excluding Lucy and Prince by the virtue of being Head of House and Deputy Head of House.

Watch highlight of Lilo’s stay in the house below.

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Entertainment

BREAKING: Ka3rina First Housemate To Be Evicted From BBNaija Lockdown Edition

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Ka3rina has been evicted from the BBNaija House lockdown edition

The Big Brother Naija reality TV show for the year 2020 started Sunday, July 19th, 2020.

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