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I’m Not A Yoruba Man — Fani-Kayode

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femi fani-kayode

Femi Fani-Kayode, a former Minister of Aviation and a chieftain of the Peoples Democratic Party, PDP, has said that he is not Yoruba.

The lawyer disclosed this on Twitter while stressing that the word “Yoruba” is alien to his culture and not known in the Anago language while revealing that the name Yoruba was derived from “Yariba” and that it means “shady and unreliable”

“Two names that the Fulani gave to southerners: “Yamiri”, in reference to SE and “Yariba” in reference to SW. The SE rejected that name but the SW accepted it. The name “Yoruba” derives from “Yariba” and it means “shady and unreliable”

“I reject that strange name and label. I am not a “Yariba” or “Yoruba” but an “Omo Karo Jire” or an “Oduduwan” and my language is not “Yoruba” but “Anago”. We are what we call ourselves. We are not “shady and uneliable”(Yariba) and we must not accept names that are given to us by our historical adversaries.

“Any Omo Karo Jire or Oduduwan that continues to call himself a “Yoruba” is lost and does not know the implications of what he is doing to his own people. He is simply affirming and confirming an insulting label which has deep sinister, mystical and spiritual connotations.

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“The word “Yoruba” did not even exist until the 18th century and even then most of the tribes of the SW, including the Oyo’s, rejected it due to its origin and meaning. The word “Yoruba” is alien to our culture and not known in the Anago language. Oduduwans please take note,” he tweeted on his official Twitter handle.

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‘Sick People Don’t Need Prayer, Give Them Money’ — Reno Omokri

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Reno Omokri, former aide to ex-President Goodluck Jonathan has taken to social media to share his views on just how powerful money is.

According to Reno, he saw the true power of money after he sent money to a sick acquaintance adding that so many sick people do not need prayers but money.

He wrote:

“I saw the power of money when I sent money to one of my congregants who was down with malaria. The bank alert unleashed a type of enthusiasm that can only be described as anti-malarial joy! Sometimes, sick people don’t need prayer. Give them money. Money is therapeutic! Bank alerts are the sweetest sound your phone can make. But, if you have a job, you only get alerted 12 times a year. However, with a business, you can get alerts DAILY. And what a positive high it gives! Start a side business so you can get high on bank alerts!.”

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Daddy Freeze Berates NYSC Skirt Agitation, Says It’s Madness

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Controversial OAP, Daddy Freeze, has reacted to the recent agitation which calls for the inclusion of ‘Skirts’ in the uniform of National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) kits.

In a post by the OAP on Friday, he stated that the movement is a madness.

He said; “Is this not madness?”

“Even the disciples had abandoned these old covenant Jewish laws as far back as 2000 years ago, so why glamorize your ignorance by resurrecting them now?”

He also gave some biblical references to enlighten those calling for the inclusion of skirt in the NYSC system in the name of religious right.

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See his post below:

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Woman Sentenced To 25 Years In Prison For Killing Husband With Eye Drops

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A South Carolina woman was Thursday sentenced to 25 years in jail after she admitted poisoning her husband by putting eye drops in his drinking water.

In a plea deal, Lana Sue Clayton, 53, pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter in the death of Steven Clayton, 64, at their home in Clover, near Charlotte, CBS-affiliate WBTV reported.

She was accused of poisoning her husband by lacing his drinking water with eye drops between July 19 and 21, 2018.

Her husband was initially thought to have died of natural causes but an autopsy toxicology report showed poisonous levels of tetrahydrozoline, which is found in eye drops.

“The coroner found a level of tetrahydrozoline in his system and that’s when we opened the case because that was very unusual for us,” York County Sheriff’s Office public information officer Trent Faris said, according to WBTV.

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Prosecutors said in 2016 she also shot her husband in back of the head with a crossbow, ABC-affiliate WSOC-TV reported.

At the time the incident was put down as an accident.

Speaking at her sentencing, she admitted poisoning her husband but claimed he had abused her.

“I did impulsively put the Visine in Stephen’s drink and I did it with the intent to make him sick and uncomfortable. I was upset about the abuse and just wanted him to leave me alone,” Clayton, wearing an orange prison jumpsuit, told the court, WBTV video showed.

“I never thought it would kill him.”

Clayton, a former Veterans Affairs Department nurse, said she got the idea of using eye drops, which are tasteless, colorless and odorless, from watching movies but thought they would cause diarrhea.

Prosecutors however said she killed her husband for money, throwing his cell phone in a lake so he could not call for help and and burning his will afterwards.

“She fooled one of the most brilliant men I’ve ever known in my life,” Steven Clayton’s sister Rosemarie Clayton-Leslie told ABC’s Good Morning America.

“My brother died a horrific death. I think my brother was screaming for his life.”

Clayton was arrested in August 2018 and charged with murder.

“Of the many homicide cases I’ve handled, this one probably takes the cake as far as being bizarre,” South Carolina Circuit Court Judge Paul Burch said.

While it is unusual, it is not the first time eye drops have featured in a homicide case.

In December 2019 a North Carolina man was charged with murdering his wife using eye drops, WSOC said.

AFP

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